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Thursday, December 8, 2016

Speaking of Brains, A Look Back




It's been a few years now since this event happened. Thankfully rhabdomyolysis has not been in the news lately, so hopefully some lessons were learned.
In the last post we presented an article that supported the fact that resistance training can facilitate brain function. The episode posted below however makes me wonder if some strength coaches even have a functioning brain. Please know, I am not against hard work, nor am I singling out any particular coach or program. It is the general attitude that seems to exist among many coaches associated with football. I played football for ten years up to the Div. I level and coached it for 23 years.I understand the need for mental toughness and team chemistry that comes from a mutual investment into doing hard things. But I also learned early on that hard work is never a substitute for smart work. I guess this comes from also having a track backround where success is measured objectively by a tape. Hard work and smart work are not mutually exclusive. You can have both. But really, what is the point of 100 squats with 240 lb. for a football player? The current state of the college game calls for a player to be on the field for 40-60 snaps that require a maximal effort for 4-6 seconds, interspersed with 30 seconds or longer breaks in between. This is January,the first games will not be until late August at the earliest. Why aren't we working on quality strength, power, and speed work now? What is the point of all of this over-the-top work capacity conditioning? Obviously this program crossed the line here, but why are so many programs following a similar lemming-like tact? Any clown can get an athlete tired and sore, it takes a real coach to make one better. If you are reading this post, you are likely a thrower or lifter who has learned to think for himself. Be grateful you are.
IOWA CITY, IOWA (AP)
Twelve University of Iowa football players have been hospitalized because of a similar kidney ailment, a newspaper reported Tuesday.
The school disclosed the athletes were admitted to University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics on Monday night but declined to release the players' names or why they are being treated. The university said the players are in stable and safe condition.
The dozen players were afflicted with exertional rhabdomyolysis, The Gazette of Cedar Rapids reported Tuesday night. According to the newspaper, the condition could affect the kidney’s ability to clear toxins from the body and could potentially cause permanent kidney failure.
All 12 players were doing fine, a source close to the situation told The Gazette.
It's unclear whether the condition stemmed from the players' recent particiation in lower-body drills that included a series of 100 squats followed by sled work, according to the newspaper.
(You don't think there could be a connection?)Such winter workouts for football are permissible under NCAA regulations.
School officials said it's not clear when the players will be discharged.
Athletic director Gary Barta said the next step is to find out what happened (
Duh! !100 Squats and sled work?)so it doesn't happen again.
“Coach Kirk Ferentz is out of town recruiting, but he is aware of the situation and is being kept abreast of the progress being made,” Gary Barta, Iowa's director of athletics, said in a statement. “Our No. 1 concern is the safety of our student-athletes, so we are pleased with the positive feedback. Our next step is to find out what happened so we can avoid this happening in the future.”

On Jan. 20, however, Shane DiBona talked about a staggering workout on Facebook: "I had to squat 240 pounds 100 times and it was timed. I can't walk and I fell down the stairs ... lifes (sic) great." (
The typical "It was hard, so it must be good for me" attitude)Also on Jan. 20, the Facebook page for former Des Moines Lincoln star Jordan Bernstine, an Iowa defensive back, reported: "Hands Down the hardest workout I've ever had in my life! I can't move!" (Did it make you better?)Iowa offensive lineman Julian Vandervelde told the Associated Press that Iowa coaches are concerned about the safety and well-being of players.
"They are nothing if not concerned for the health of the players," Vandervelde said. "That's always the first priority, health and development. I mean workouts are never used to punish.
"It's always about improvement, and workouts are always well within the capabilities of the athletes asked to perform them."
(Then why are 12 hospitalized?)Tom Moore, a university spokesman, said university officials were still attempting to ascertain the exact cause of the problem.
"The cause is not completely clear," Moore said, "but the faculty and staff are doing an excellent job taking care of these student-athletes. We are still working on why this happened."
(Hint, look at the workout!)Calls made to the Iowa sports information office and Barta on Tuesday afternoon weren't immediately returned. (Too busy trying figure out what happened?)
Work hard and smart! It's never too early to get started!

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